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In recent years, studies have found that Britain is becoming more economically and socially divided. Low income families, as well as young people, are working harder and harder but, somehow, stands still. Fewer young people than ever are able to climb the social ladder and attend college, and much less make a living for themselves rather than just surviving. Thus, to make the point to identify, highlight, and measure the problem of the low social mobility in Britain and point of the way in which Britain can overcome these obstacles.

                      There has come a breach in the British society as more young people don’t go to top-level colleges and, as a result, cannot get a well-paying job. A report by Social Mobility Commission shows that only 0.1 per cent of school leavers who received free school meals ended up progressing to Oxbridge, or any other top-level college, and only around 25 per cent attended other forms of higher education1. This makes it much harder for young people to get a high paying job. Even so, it has become known that the location of the children plays a huge role in social mobility, as it has shown that the children in London have a highest chance of improving their lives, while those in West Somerset have the lowest. A writer for the Guardian tells her story as one of the few socially mobile people, and for her, it has not been easy to juggle everything with very little income. She also described how the place in which she stayed were “1.5 times less likely to get careers advice” and “parents’ insider experiences won’t navigate them to higher paychecks”2.

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                      The Social Mobility Commission states that those born in and after the 1980’s are “the first post-war cohort to start their working years with higher incomes than their immediate predecessors”3. In order to solve this quickly escalating problem, the commission proposed a 10-year program that would include building up to three million homes. Where only building houses wouldn’t help much other than giving poor and young people a place to stay, the commission had other recommendations that would include a ban on unpaid internships, scrapping low-quality apprenticeships, a “Second Chance Career Fund”, a new social mobility league table to encourage universities to widen access, and to cut the number of 16-18-year-old NEETS to zero by 20224.

                      Of those recommendations, one of the important ones to highlight is the ban on unpaid internships. These forms of work have become very popular in recent years, as they provide firms with extra hands for free and gives the intern the knowledge and experience for future jobs. However, these unpaid internships do nothing more than further damage the lower-class people who in most cases will only be offered such jobs. Many young people move to London to get more experience and hopefully a better job. London is also the city with the most unpaid internships, which most young people will take in order to get a good job further down the line, and to be able to live in the city, the young people have to take up other part time jobs to support themselves. In the end, it does nothing more than further stress out the unpaid intern rather than give then expertise needed to get further in life.

                      However, social mobility seems to be a bit more complex than just so. Poppy Noor, who wrote about the struggles of social mobility, reflected on how it wasn’t just the material things – such as education and income –  that made it hard for her to make a decent living, but her accent would potentially be a reason why she got denied job after job5. As she was lucky enough to study at a top-level college, she had to move to another city where the people speak with a different accent, which in her case would be more sophisticated. She writes that working-class people are locked out of all types of career opportunities based solely on background and are denied jobs for not conforming to invisible middle-class dress codes. This means that even if people were able to go to college, have a decent living, etc., jobs would still discriminate based on where in England the person seeking the job is from.

                      In conclusion, the conditionsHBA1  for the poor part of the British people are getting worse, as the availability for social mobility weakens. It has become a high priority to strengthen their positions in the society, as many of these people are young people seeking jobs and influencing the future generations. It is now just as important for the government to recognize and improve the livelihood for the low-income earners and young people, but for the society to not discriminate those less fortunate seeking jobs.

1 Social Mobility Commission. “Statistics from State of the Nation 2016: Social Mobility in Great Britain.” Guardian Graphic. Between 2010 and 2014 only 0.1% of school leavers who received free school meals progressed to Oxbridge

 

2 Noor, Poppy. “Transience, poverty and hard work: that’s the lot of the working-Class graduate in a Britain that reserves its best jobs for the wealthy.” The Guardian, 16 Nov. 2016.

 

3 Grice, Andrew. “Middle-Income families, young and poor being ‘left behind economically’, government warned.” The Independent, 16 Nov. 2016.

 

4 Grice, Andrew. “Middle-Income families, young and poor being ‘left behind economically’, government warned.” The Independent, 16 Nov. 2016.

 

5 Noor, Poppy. “Transience, poverty and hard work: that’s the lot of the working-Class graduate in a Britain that reserves its best jobs for the wealthy.” The Guardian, 16 Nov. 2016.

 HBA1Remember to clearly mark the final paragraph as the Sum up, In conclusion, – you choose what to write, but clearly 

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